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20121202
20121210
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be scientists. there is all this talk about we have to do the recording to the science. while the talks might begin moving at a snail's pace -- like a caravan stuck in a sandstorm. everyone seems to be breaking your neck to get far away from the sides as possible. the world is already here. and whether the u.s. or any other country, including my own andhey are living in it -- i would hope maybe their kids would turn around and tell their parents, haven't you noticed? we are already there. >> that was ronny jumeau of the seychelles. before that, you heard jonathan pershing, the chief climate change negotiator. so far, the u.s. envoy tod stern has only held one news conference after one week and half. he was goodlett told another one today, but if you look at today's list of meetings, the event is the only one marked in red. a press conference was cancelled. ronny jumeau is with us here in doha, representative of the alliance of small island states. and we are joined by martin khor, executive director of the south centre in malaysia. ambassador, you're on the panel with the jonathan pershing, t
into confirming that einstein was right. let me say a neat thing about science too. in a lot of fields, there'll be some sort of hero like einstein's our hero, here. we all love einstein. most of us do, yeah. so, einstein's our hero, and you tend to think, "well, if he's a hero, you don't wanna take shots at him." but in science, it's different. in science, say "hero-schmero." everybody is trying to crack that hero and find something wrong. everyone's attacking to see if they can find something wrong. and so science doesn't rest upon the reputation of some hero. science rests upon everyone else trying to find a crack in that theory. and all attempts, so far, have only gone on to substantiate this: time really is different when you're moving. but i'll tell you what? we're gonna talk more about these ideas next time and you know what i wanna do for you now? i wanna share with you a film that a friend of mine made way back in 1976. when i was teaching these ideas in the early '70s, i discovered this kind of treatment at the class board. that's one thing about teaching, you learn at the class boa
, that's junior high school knowledge, yeah, anyone takes a science course. what we wanna know is why all that energy, and i have a model for you to consider. and it has to do with mass. see on the table here, i have-- oh, it's imagination time. look, i have all the 92 elements in the periodic table that's found commonly in the earth's crust, almost all 92, are all arranged here. see the hydrogen here? see the hydrogen atom? what's this one here? helium. helium. what's this one? lithium. lithium. i got no names, but you can just kinda look at them, right? what's the next one? i keep running after you. i know what the last one is. you guys know what the last one is, 92? begins with u. uranium. uranium. excellent. okay. and so i have all the atoms all lined up here. can you see them? at least in your mind's eye. now what i'm gonna do is i'm gonna shake the atoms. i'm gonna take the hydrogen-- just the nucleus of the atom, okay? i take the hydrogen, i shake it back and forth, okay? now, it's harder to shake the helium. how come? because it has more mass. there's four nucleons. over here is o
find something else out about them. keach: barbour's curiosity led him to the modern science of fingerprints where he discovered that with a large enough sample he might be able to discern the gender of the person who made the print. males have wider ridges. females have narrower ones. through trial and error, he devised a technique to make permanent molds of the fingerprints. from these he began to construct a sample. finally, an intriguing discovery -- direct evidence that one set of workers was being replaced by another. barbour: it appears that the early handmade figurines were made by females. after the establishment of apartment compounds in teotihuacan about 250 a.d., you get a shift to wider ridges on the late handmade figurines and the early moldmade figurines. so it appears that when you have the development of the apartment compound that males come into the industry. keach: so as the city grew, the figurine industry changed. initially worked by women, probably as part of their domestic duties, it became a separate full-time specialization performed by men. with men
of the negotiation is out of touch with all the science says, and president obama and other political leaders need to recognize, nature does not negotiate. we have to change. sadly, these negotiators are not reflecting that urgency and the ambition of the kind of change we need to see. >> i want to turn for a moment to my questioning of jonathan pershing. he was part of a news conference yesterday, along with other climate negotiators from around the world. i think the conference was called to meet the negotiators. this is what's the u.s. negotiator jonathan pershing responded. >> several civil society groups are extremely frustrated. president obama, in his first speech after elected, said that he did that want our children to live in an america that is threatened by the destructive power of a warming planet. yesterday, a number of groups held a news conference, and they said at that news conference, kumi naidoo of greenpeace international, said todd stern and jonathan pershing have come to doha with their needles stuck in a group of obstructing the process of art. he said that it is disrespectfu
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5